Yale to hold psych conference on Trump’s mental health

By: Henri Nolan
April 20, 2017

  • President Donald Trump reads a bill he signed that will extend a program allowing some veterans to seek health care in the private sector, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, April 19, 2017. Photo: Al Drago /The New York Times / NYTNS

Photo: Al Drago /The New York Times
Image 1of/3

Caption

Close

Image 1 of 3
President Donald Trump reads a bill he signed that will extend a program allowing some veterans to seek health care in the private sector, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, April 19, 2017.
President Donald Trump reads a bill he signed that will extend a program allowing some veterans to seek health care in the private sector, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, April 19, 2017.
Photo: Al Drago /The New York Times
Image 2 of 3
President Donald Trump listens to guests speak after signing the Veterans Choice Program And Improvement Act in the Roosevelt Room at the White House April 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump listens to guests speak after signing the Veterans Choice Program And Improvement Act in the Roosevelt Room at the White House April 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images
Image 3 of 3
U.S. President Donald Trump listens after signing bill S. 544, the Veterans Choice Program Extension and Improvement Act, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, April 19, 2017.
U.S. President Donald Trump listens after signing bill S. 544, the Veterans Choice Program Extension and Improvement Act, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, April
Photo: Molly Riley / Bloomberg

Yale to hold psych conference on Trump’s mental health
1 / 3
Back to Gallery

A group of mental health professionals claiming President is too mentally ill to serve has taken fire not just from Trump supporters — but also from those in their own field.

The organization’s members, however, remain steadfast in their belief that Trump is a potential hazard to the American people.

“We feel, as mental health professionals, that we have a duty to the public to warn them about Donald Trump’s mental illness,” said , a former a part-time assistant professor of psychiatry at .

Gartner is a founding member of Duty to Warn, an organization of mental health professionals who think Trump is mentally unfit to be president. The group will have its first conference 11 a.m. Thursday at ’s Sterling Hall of Medicine.

Gartner and other members of Duty to Warn are lobbying members of Congress to remove Trump from office due to lack of mental fitness. Though a petition supporting this effort has garnered 41,000 signatures, Gartner said the effort has gotten little traction among legislators.

The initiative has, not surprisingly, drawn criticism from Republican Trump supporters, including state chairman JR Romano.

“I think this is absolutely ridiculous,” he said. “If something like this had gone on surrounding ’s administration, it would have been shouted down as racist.”

Those within the psychiatric establishment also take issue with Duty to Warn, claiming it violates the , which asserts that psychiatrists “should not give professional opinions about the mental state of individuals that they have not personally and thoroughly evaluated,” according to the web site.

The Thursday event’s organizer is Dr. , assistant clinical professor in the of Psychiatry.

“As some prominent psychiatrists have noted, (Trump’s mental health) is the elephant in the room,” Lee said. “I think the public is really starting to catch on and widely talk about this now.”

Gartner said Trump displays characteristics indicative of a variety of mental illnesses, including antisocial personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder. He said a major red flag was when Trump and his surrogates — most notably Press Secretary — said Trump’s inauguration crowd was the largest ever.

“If Donald Trump really believes he had the largest crowd size in history, that’s delusional,” Gartner said.

The Trump administration’s claims were in response to photos that seemed to show a much smaller crowd at Trump’s inauguration than at that of predecessor Barack Obama. Several media outlets disputed the Trump administration’s numbers, including those comparing the number of Metro train riders on both inauguration days.

But Gartner said the rule shouldn’t apply when someone’s mental state poses a public danger, which he said is the case with Trump.

“This is a bomb on an airplane,” he said. “This is an emergency.”


Related Topics
New 'ninja' drug can tackle and diagnose dementia
Early results suggest the drug — known as PMN310 — is more effective at blocking the spread of toxic groups than other drugs currently being trialled as Alzheimer's treatments (file pic)In younger…
Top Cannabis Strains for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease
      Here are the top 5 strains recommended for dementia:     NYC Diesel is an award-winning hybrid with high amounts of THC, but is a popular choice for patients who enjoy daytime medication. Top…
Experts: Push for youth mental health services can't slow
Read more of our Kids in Crisis seriesSTORY: Living without gender, working to survive into adulthoodRELATED: Kids' mental health is focus of Day of ActionCHECK OUT THE SERIES: See all our Kids in Crisis…
Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners focus on the small wins
 And as Jeppeson pursues a career in mental health care, a facet of health care in which nurses are in short supply, she'll be filling an important health care access gap for rural Iowans in the Storm…
Netflix documentary draws attention to mental health and teen suicide
Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email (Opens…